[Met Performance] CID:79060
Faust {323} Metropolitan Opera House: 11/19/1921.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 19, 1921


FAUST {323}
Gounod-Barbier/Carré

Faust...................Mario Chamlee
Marguerite..............Florence Easton
Méphistophélès..........Léon Rothier
Valentin................Giuseppe De Luca
Siebel..................Mary Ellis
Marthe..................Louise Bérat
Wagner..................Louis D'Angelo

Conductor...............Albert Wolff

Director................Samuel Thewman
Designer................Joseph Urban

Faust received six performances this season.

Review of J. A. H. in Musical America

A Popular First 'Faust'

The first popular Saturday night performance, on Nov. 19, was of Gounod's "Faust," which was of considerable interest in view of the fact that three of the principals made first appearances here in their respective roles. These were Florence Easton as Marguerite, Mario Chamlee in the title role, and Giuseppe de Luca as Valentine. The remainder of the cast included Leon Rothier as Mephistopheles, Louis d'Angelo as Wagner, Louise Berat as Marthe and Mary Ellis as Siebel. Albert Wolff conducted for the first time this season. The performance as a whole was only fair, due to obvious lack of rehearsal, for the chorus in the Kermesse scene wavered at one point, and then stopped, leaving the orchestra to fight it out alone for several measures. Interest, therefore, centered in the performances of the three principals in their new parts.

Vocally Miss Easton's Marguerite was above praise in every respect, and dramatically, it exhibited a carefully thought-out piece of work of such fine detail that it could easily have stood as a histrionic achievement without the music. The little bits of "business" with the spinning-wheel and the jewels were wholly delightful and the entire performance added yet another to Miss Easton's many perfect characterizations.

Mr. Chamlee had sung Faust only once before and never at the Metropolitan. Making allowances for a few slips in his cues, it was vocally very fine, and after the "Salut Demeure" especially, he was the recipient of well-deserved applause.

Mr. De Luca's Valentine, in which part, by the way, he made his original operatic appearance at Piacenza in 1897, was one of the best pieces of singing this fine artist has ever done. In "Avent de Quitte ces Lieux," in the second scene, his voice was thrilling, and in the trio and death scene he sustained a high level both of singing and acting. The other members of the cast were uniformly good.



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