[Met Performance] CID:79150
Aida {268} Metropolitan Opera House: 11/26/1921.

(Debut: Viola Philo
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 26, 1921


AIDA {268}
Giuseppe Verdi--Antonio Ghislanzoni

Aida....................Frances Peralta
Radamès.................Giovanni Martinelli
Amneris.................Flora Perini
Amonasro................Giuseppe Danise
Ramfis..................Adamo Didur
King....................William Gustafson
Messenger...............Pietro Audisio
Priestess...............Viola Philo [Debut]
Dance...................Rosina Galli

Conductor...............Roberto Moranzoni

Review of Oscar Thompson in Musical America

Peralta sings 'Aida'

"Aida" at the Metropolitan, for the first time this season, rejoiced the second Saturday night audience, which apparently included all the standees the fire regulations would permit. Rosa Ponselle, who was to have sung the title role, was absent from the cast, her place being taken by Frances Peralta, to whom the part was by no means a new one, but who had not previously been afforded an opportunity to appear in it at the Metropolitan. She sang and acted effectively, disclosing vocal powers ample for the rôle, but exhibiting a tendency to drive her upper tones too strenuously. The Radames was the familiar one of Giovanni Martinelli who, on this occasion, was in ringing good voice; the Amneris was Flora Perini, who repeated her capable impersonation of last season; and the Amonasro was the vocally resonant and dramatically satisfying Giuseppe Danise. An otherwise competent, if not brilliant, cast included Adamo Didur as Ramfis and William Gustafson as the King.

Viola Philo made an unseen debut as the Priestess, singing the off-stage music of the Temple Scene with a voice that came to the ears as one full and rich, agreeable in quality and of ample volume. There was some straying from the pitch on the part of several of the principals, but the performance was a generally satisfying one.

Rosina Galli's divertissement in the Triumph Scene was an especially charming one, but one wearies of the little Nubians who kick up their heels in the preceding picture. Mr. Moranzoni conducted and there was no want of orchestral or choral vigor.



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