[Met Performance] CID:79400
La Navarraise {10}
L'Oracolo {35}
Metropolitan Opera House: 12/15/1921.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 15, 1921


LA NAVARRAISE {10}

Anita...................Geraldine Farrar
Araquil.................Morgan Kingston
Garrido.................Lon Rothier
Remigio.................Louis D'Angelo
Ramon...................Giordano Paltrinieri
Bustamente..............Paolo Ananian


Conductor...............Albert Wolff


L'ORACOLO {35}
Leoni-Zanoni

Ah-Joe..................Florence Easton
Uin-San-Lui.............Orville Harrold
Cim-Fen.................Antonio Scotti
Uin-Sc.................Adamo Didur
Hu-Tsin.................Millo Picco
Hu-C...................Ada Quintina
Hua-Qui.................Myrtle Schaaf
Fortuneteller...........Pietro Audisio

Conductor...............Roberto Moranzoni

Director................Armando Agnini
Set designer............James Fox

L'Oracolo received four performances this season.

Review of Oscar Thompson in Musical America

"Chim-Fang" Scotti Rolls an Orange

"L'Oracolo" had its first performance of the season on Thursday night and was notable, as usual, for the superlative picture of the malignant Chim-Fang drawn by Scotti. Admirers of the baritone are divided these days between Scarpia and the evil Chinaman of Hatchet Row in determining the question as to which of his roles gives him most scope for the exercise of his great gifts as an actor. There cannot be much doubt about the part that best tests him when the matter becomes purely vocal. He does no better singing than as Chim-Fang. He has been rolling the orange of enticement toward Hoo-Chee for some time now, and Hoo-Chee, in the person of Ada Quintina, is noticeably becoming an armful. Florence Easton again brought vocal distinction to the part of Ah-Yoe, and Adamo Didur was as dignified as ever as the patriarchal Win-Shee. There was a new Hoo-Tsin in Millo Picco and a new Hua-Quee in Myrtle Schaaf. Moranzoni was in his accustomed place and made the score sparkle.

Perhaps the light of Leoni's music was brighter after the dullness of "La Navarraise," which preceded it. It was not the fault of Albert Wolff that Massenet's episode of the Carlist war fell so flat. The conductor labored valiantly enough. Why the kindly dust upon the score was ever disturbed is a question that is difficult to answer. This first repetition of the revived work saw Morgan Kingston as Araquil in place of Crimi. Geraldine Farrar was again the Anita, with voice pitched to a delicacy that suggested the confidential. The double-bill was too much for the valorous railbirds who nightly defy the slings and arrows of operatic fortune. Very few of them turned up.



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