[Met Performance] CID:80550
Il Barbiere di Siviglia {117} Metropolitan Opera House: 03/10/1922.

(Debut: Angeles Ottein
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
March 10, 1922


IL BARBIERE DI SIVIGLIA {117}

Figaro..................Titta Ruffo
Rosina..................Angeles Ottein [Debut]
Count Almaviva..........Mario Chamlee
Dr. Bartolo.............Pompilio Malatesta
Don Basilio.............Adamo Didur
Berta...................Louise Bérat
Fiorello................Vincenzo Reschiglian
Sergeant................Pietro Audisio

Conductor...............Gennaro Papi

[In the Lesson Scene Ottein sang Il Carnevale di Venezia (Benedict).]

Review of Oscar Thompson in Musical America

Début of Angeles Ottein

Reports from the West, where she had sung with what was described as sensational success with the Scotti Opera Company, played a part in awakening a lively interest in the début of a new coloratura soprano, Angeles Ottein, at the Metropolitan, Friday night. The opera was Rossini's "Barber of Seville," which already had served three sopranos in exhibiting their vocal graces during earlier weeks of the season at the Broadway house. With Miss Ottein in the cast were Titta Ruffo, but recently returned from a concert tour, as Figaro; Mario Chamlee as Almaviva, Adamo Didur as Basilio, Pompilio Malatesta as Don Bartolo, and Louise Berat, Vincenzo Reschiglian and Pietro Audisio in secondary rôles.

Like Maria Barrientos, a Rosina of recent memory, Miss Ottein is a Spanish artist. Dark, plump, quick of motion and broad of smile, she was as active on the stage as she was merry and coquettish. Vocally, she provoked wonder, if not always delight, by vaulting to heights beyond the usual reach of such voices, with several F's in altissimo - or was one of these highest tones a stepladder G? Her staccato was particularly clean-cut and facile; indeed, hers seemed almost a staccato voice. All this, however, was aside from, or at the expense of, musical quality. Due to several different methods of producing her tone, it was now dulcet, now hard, now sparkling, and again metallic. Virtually none of the many skyrocketing phrases sung by her were of gratifying sound, and some even tempted smiles. It must be recorded that she was vociferously applauded after "Una Voce Poco Fa" and her aria in the lesson scene, Benedict's "Carnival of Venice."

The performance was a lively one, and inclined more than ordinarily to comedy of the slapstick variety. Ruffo, in improved voice and evident high spirits, gave to the stage business much of its vim. Didur was a grotesque Don Basilio, in looks, action and in voice. Malatesta seemed encouraged to carry his part well beyond the borders of burlesque. Chamlee sang admirably, as he nearly always does, but Almaviva is not an altogether happy rôle for him



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