[Met Performance] CID:80770
L'Oracolo {37}
L'Amore dei Tre Re {35}
Metropolitan Opera House: 03/25/1922.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
March 25, 1922


L'ORACOLO {37}

Ah-Joe..................Marie Sundelius
Uin-San-Lui.............Orville Harrold
Cim-Fen.................Antonio Scotti
Uin-Sc.................Giovanni Martino
Hu-Tsin.................Louis D'Angelo
Hu-C...................Ada Quintina
Hua-Qui.................Cecil Arden
Fortuneteller...........Pietro Audisio

Conductor...............Giuseppe Bamboschek


L'AMORE DEI TRE RE {35}

Fiora...................Florence Easton
Avito...................Beniamino Gigli
Manfredo................Millo Picco
Archibaldo..............Lon Rothier
Flaminio................Angelo Bad
Maid....................Minnie Egener
Young Woman.............Grace Anthony
Old Woman...............Louise Brat
Youth...................Giordano Paltrinieri
Shepherd................Cecil Arden

Conductor...............Roberto Moranzoni

Review signed J. A. H. in Musical America

"L'Oracolo" and "L'Amore"

A somewhat lengthy combination for one performance, Leoni's "L'Oracolo" and Montemezzi's "L'Amore dei Tre Re," were given on the evening of March 25. In the first opera, the cast included Marie Sundelius, Cecil Arden and Ada Quintina, Orville Harrold, Antonio Scotti, Giovanni Martino, Louis D'Angelo and Pietro Audisio. Mr. Bamboschek conducted. Mr. Martino sang Winshee for the first time, and sang it exceedingly well. The performance as a whole was lacking in force, though all the artists sang well. The same was true of "L'Amore." Mme. Easton, who had sung a trying role in "Cosi Fan Tutte" the night before, while in good voice, did not achieve the artistic heights one has come to expect from this sterling artist. The secondary feminine roles were assumed by Grace Anthony, Louise Berat, Minnie Egener and Myrtle Schaaf. Mr. Gigli as Avito sang much of the music very beautifully, although the part is not among those which best suit him. Mr. Picco as Manfredo did good work and Mr. Rothier, appearing for the first time as Archibaldo, both sang and acted with distinction. Mr. Moranzoni, at the conductor's desk, let the performance drag in spots, and in the restatement of the love theme in the first act, and again in the second act, the wind instruments were allowed to obscure the beautiful melody in the strings. The audience was a capacity one and very demonstrative, especially in the upper regions and among the standees



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