[Met Performance] CID:82030
L'Amore dei Tre Re {38} Metropolitan Opera House: 11/16/1922.

(Debuts: Edward Johnson, Laura Robertson
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 16, 1922


L'AMORE DEI TRE RE {38}
Montemezzi-S. Benelli

Fiora...................Lucrezia Bori
Avito...................Edward Johnson [Debut]
Manfredo................Giuseppe Danise
Archibaldo..............Adamo Didur
Flaminio................Giordano Paltrinieri
Maid....................Grace Anthony
Young Woman.............Laura Robertson [Debut]
Old Woman...............Henriette Wakefield
Youth...................Giordano Paltrinieri
Shepherd................Cecil Arden

Conductor...............Roberto Moranzoni

Director................Armando Agnini
Set designer............Mario Sala
Costume designer........Giuseppe Mancini

L'Amore dei Tre Re received one performance this season.

Review of Oscar Thompson in Musical America

The first important debut of the new season was that of Edward Johnson, the Canadian tenor, in Monteniezzi's "L'Amore dei Tre Re," which held in thrall the Thursday night subscribers. That these were not more generously reinforced by standees only went to prove again that Montemezzi is not Puccini in the affections of those who make their habitat behind the rail. This is their loss. Certainly nothing has come out of Italy since "Otello" and "Falstaff" comparable to "L'Amore" and, when it is presented as it was Thursday, it must be counted one of the finest achievements of the Metropolitan.

Lucrezia Bori returned to her incomparable embodiment of Fiora. The spirit of Benelli's poetry breathed in her every movement and floated in tonal beauty with every inflection of her voice. Here was no manneristic writhing, no extravagant contortions in the quest of luridness. More power of voice might enhance her vividness in climactic moments; yet, with that increased power and vividness, something of the fragrant mystery of this rare mountain flower might vanish.

Johnson's Avito was worthy of such a Fiora. It was pictorial to look upon, chivairesque in action, and manly and vibrant in song. Though perhaps in no important detail different from his previous assumptions of the role with the Chicagoans, it gained in effectiveness by reason of its more refined environment. Giuseppe Danise sang the music of Manfredo with a sensitive regard for its melodic beauty no other baritone known to New York has given it. Adamo Didur's Archibaldo was again a figure of such tragic power that it was easy to condone his vocal roughness which seemed, in the end, to become almost an essential part of the characterization.

The cast, an altogether excellent one, included a new member in Laura Robertson, who sang one of the small parts in the final scene. Others participating were Giordano Paltrinieri, Pietro Audisio, Grace Anthony, Henrietta Wakefield and Cecil Arden. Mr. Moranzoni's reading of the score was one of the best he has given in many performances of it.



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