[Met Performance] CID:82280
Loreley {7} Metropolitan Opera House: 12/6/1922.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 6, 1922


LORELEY {7}
Catalani-D'Ormeville/Zanardini

Loreley.................Frances Alda
Walter..................Beniamino Gigli
Anna....................Marie Sundelius
Hermann.................Giuseppe Danise
Rudolfo.................José Mardones
Dance...................Rosina Galli
Dance...................Giuseppe Bonfiglio

Conductor...............Roberto Moranzoni

Director................Samuel Thewman
Set designer............Antonio Rovescalli
Costume designer........Mathilde Castel-Bert
Choreographer...........Rosina Galli

Loreley received four performances this season.

Review of R. M. K. in Musical America

Alda as "Loreley"

"Loreley" re-emerged in the Metropolitan's musical stream for the first time this season on Wednesday of last week, with a new and resplendent protagonist of the titular rôle in the person of Frances Alda. The part seems ideally fitted to this artist, and she sang it very well indeed, with lyric phrases of unusual beauty in the higher register. Also her dramatic portrayal was convincing. The remainder of the cast was familiar to last season's audiences, Beniamino Gigli singing the mellifluous phrases of the unfortunate Walter, and Marie Sundelius giving a good, if slightly routine, performance as Anna. Giuseppe Danise made a great deal of the rather thankless part of Hermann. Jose Mardones as Rudolph did magnificently by that stern Margrave. The choruses were lustily performed, and the scenic features which play so large a part in this aquatic drama were well manipulated and sufficiently impressive. The ballet conveyed the illusion of swimming river sprites felicitously; Rosina Galli and Giuseppe Bonfiglio, with their followers tripped very prettily in the Flower Dance of the villagers in the second act, and the ladies of the ensemble in garish greens were similarly seductive in the last act scene of Walter's suicidal remorse. The conductorship of the opera devolved again upon Mr. Moranzoni, and it is to be regretted that he set a rather slow tempo for the dramatically innocuous and musically dull moments of the second act. For the rest all went well.



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