[Met Performance] CID:82420
Ernani {11} Matinee ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 12/16/1922.

(Debut: Jane Overton
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 16, 1922 Matinee


ERNANI {11}
Giuseppe Verdi--Francesco Maria Piave

Ernani..................Giovanni Martinelli
Elvira..................Rosa Ponselle
Don Carlo...............Titta Ruffo
Don Ruy Gomez de Silva..José Mardones
Giovanna................Grace Anthony
Don Riccardo............Angelo Badà
Jago....................Vincenzo Reschiglian

Spanish and Oriental Divertissement
1) Scherzo Spagñolo: Rosina Galli, Jane Overton [Debut], Giuseppe Bonfiglio
2) Oriental Dance (Turkish and Arabian): Corps de Ballet
3) Gitanella: Rosina Galli, Giuseppe Bonfiglio
4) Ensemble: Rosina Galli, Giuseppe Bonfiglio, Corps de Ballet

Conductor...............Gennaro Papi

Director................Samuel Thewman
Set designer............Joseph Urban
Costume designer........Gretel Urban
Choreographer...........Rosina Galli

Ernani received four performances this season.

Review of Pitts Sanborn in the Globe

Mr. Gatti-Casazza has spared neither singers nor scenery to make this revival truly sumptuous. Joseph Urban provides elaborate settings and, in the case of the subterranean tomb of Charlemagne, touches the zenith of his achievements. Titta Ruffo was to have made his first appearance with the company in the rôle of Don Carlos, but instead succumbed to a "sudden indisposition." Therefore, Giuseppe Danise who had replaced Mr. Ruffo at the dress rehearsal, continued to replace him last evening. Difficult as the part is, he sang it with a gratifying degree of success, and in presence and acting he was very satisfactory. In Elvira's music the voice of Miss Ponselle was nothing short of glorious. It is a voice that has both the low range and the high range for this exacting rôle, and she seems to have made distinct progress as a singer.

The rich and ringing tenor of Mr. Martinelli is just the voice to give Ernani's music its full effect, and Mr. Martinelli sang always with a splendid and communicating enthusiasm. Only one would warn this admirable singer against a tendency to expend too much tone, a tendency probably due to nervousness in an unfamiliar rôle. Mr. Martinelli is so magnificently endowed with voice that there is not the slightest need of his ever forcing it. In the role of Don Ruy Gomes de Silva the noble voice and the superb singing of Mr. Mardones were really something to worship. After his delivery of the "Infelice" the audience gave him an ovation.

The chorus which has a great deal to do in this opera, covered itself and Giulio Setti, its expert trainer, with fresh and added glory. Mr. Papi made one think of a young Toscanini, not only because he conducted the orchestra from memory, but because of the irresistible energy with which he led the four-act charge.

The audience was very large and one of the most demonstrative of the season. So for the present one suspects that New York will be only too glad to repeat with Meredith over again:
O the horn! The horn!
The horn of the Old Gentleman!



Added Index Entries for Subjects and Names


Back to short citation(s).