[Met Performance] CID:8280
Tannhäuser {49} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/13/1890.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 13, 1890


TANNHÄUSER {49

Tannhäuser..............Heinrich Vogl
Elisabeth...............Sophie Wiesner
Wolfram.................Theodore Reichmann
Venus...................Lilli Lehmann
Hermann.................Conrad Behrens
Walther.................Albert Mittelhauser
Heinrich................Martin Paché
Biterolf................Joseph Arden
Reinmar.................Jean Doré
Shepherd................Félicie Kaschowska

Conductor...............Anton Seidl

Unsigned review in The New York Times

METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE.

Wagner's noble opera "Tannhäuser" was again performed in a somewhat uneven manner at the Metropolitan Opera House last evening. The chief defect of the representation was once more the inability of Herr Vogl to deal with the lyric passages of his part. The rôle of Tannhäuser is very exacting in its demands, for it requires both declamatory and lyric powers of a high order. In the declamatory scenes Herr Vogl leaves but little to be desired. In the great scene of his return in the third act he largely atoned for his previous shortcomings by his fine dramatic force. But it must be admitted with regret that Herr Vogl cannot sing Tannhäuser's song in praise of love, and that he falls far short of the vocal requirements of the part in the second act.

The most satisfactory interpretation of the evening was again Herr Reichmann's Wolfram. This admirable artist is worthy of high praise both in declaiming and in purely lyric work. His singing of Wolfram's song in the contest and of the lovely address to the evening star has never been surpassed, and we think never equaled in New York. It was worthy of a great baritone. Herr Reichmann's acting is earnest, but it is frequently deficient in clearness of design. Many of his gestures appear to be aimless, and his facial expression is decidedly lacking in variety.

Fräulein Wiesner's Elizabeth was considerably improved last night. It is probable that this young and inexperienced singer suffers not a little from nervousness at first performances. Certain it is that last evening she had much better command of her voice, and her tremolo was less pronounced. Frau Lehmann's Venus needs no further comment. It was as noble a performance as heretofore. Special praise is due the orchestra for its smooth and expressive treatment of the rich instrumentation, for which, of course, Herr Seidl is fairly entitled to a large share of the thanks. Tomorrow evening Verdi's "Aida" will be given.



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