[Met Performance] CID:82840
Guillaume Tell [William Tell] {16} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/15/1923.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 15, 1923
In Italian


GUILLAUME TELL [WILLIAM TELL] {16}

Guillaume Tell............Giuseppe Danise
Mathilde................Rosa Ponselle
Arnold..................Giovanni Martinelli
Walter..................José Mardones
Gesler..................Adamo Didur
Melcthal................Louis D'Angelo
Hedwige.................Flora Perini
Jemmy...................Marie Sundelius
Fisherman...............Max Bloch
Leuthold................Millo Picco
Rodolphe................Angelo Badà
Dance...................Florence McNally
Dance...................Jessie York
Dance...................Jane Overton
Dance...................Jessie Rogge

Conductor...............Gennaro Papi

Review of Mary Ellis Opdyke in the New York Sun

'William Tell' Is Repeated

Last night's repetition of Rossini's "William Tell" at the Metropolitan helped again to prove the inherent value of this opera as opera. It has all the operatic qualities. In the first place the overture, being quite unconnected with the action, may be put at the beginning of the second act when, with adequate lighting, all the box holders can watch all the later ones make their entrance, and Mr. Papi can receive a unanimous round of applause.

Next, all the operatic ingredients are neatly separated. When Miss Ponselle sings her aria in the second act, which she does with velvet opulence, there is no protagonist there to distract her and no intricate dramatic importance to bother the mind. When Mr. Martinelli reaches his highest notes, and they are cruelly high, the orchestra is quiet. The plot itself can injure no one. Patriotism, filial piety and Swiss scenery make "William Tell" and the tale is universally acceptable.

But, best of all is the kind manner in which the opera favors its audience. One always knows when to stop whispering and begin to clap by the cadential harmonies of each aria. There are plenty of pauses for applause. There are plenty of subjects suggested for American conversation, from the merit of motoring roads around Altdorf to reminiscent war time indignation at the Austrian yoke. The ballet is long enough to permit many an extended flirtation in the parterre with no excuse for listening to the music, and the fire is short enough to exact a modicum of nervous tension from the weary dowager.

Didur is given his fill of wicked pomp and Sundelius every advantage possible in the archery contest. Danise is vouchsafed power for his boat more reliable than any Evenrude motor. Every one has a good time. One may suffer with the heroes and heroines of lyric drama but not with "William Tell," for this is grand opera as animated concert in costume, and able to vie in general popularity with the brightest lights on Broadway.



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