[Met Performance] CID:83020
Il Barbiere di Siviglia {119} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/29/1923.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 29, 1923


IL BARBIERE DI SIVIGLIA {119}
Rossini-Sterbini

Figaro..................Titta Ruffo
Rosina..................Amelita Galli-Curci
Count Almaviva..........Mario Chamlee
Dr. Bartolo.............Pompilio Malatesta
Don Basilio.............Adamo Didur
Berta...................Marie Mattfeld
Fiorello................Vincenzo Reschiglian
Sergeant................Pietro Audisio

Conductor...............Gennaro Papi

Director................Armando Agnini
Set designer............Mario Sala

Il Barbiere di Siviglia received three performances this season.

[In the Lesson Scene Galli-Curci sang Je suis Titania from Mignon.]

Review of Max Smith in the American

There was much laughter in the Metropolitan last night; also much applause. For the opera that opened the twelfth week of the season was "Il Barbiere di Siviglia," which accounted for the frequent outbursts of merriment; and the cast included two such "stars" as Amelita Galli-Curci (the Rosina) and Titta Ruffo (the Figaro) who invariably, no matter what their vocal condition, evoke tumultuous demonstrations of approval.

Truth to tell, the famous prima donna disclosed her persuasions to better advantage than at either of her two previous appearances. And her distinguished baritone associate proved to be not only in good voice but in excellent spirits, wherefore a good deal of the hand-clapping, even that which comes from the usual storm-centers, was well merited.

Not that Mme. Galli-Curci's intonation always hit the mark. Now her voice would ring true to the pitch, now sag below it a Chinese fraction of a tone, as in the "voce poco fa" air. And at the close of "Home Sweet Home," self-accompanied, tendered as a second interpolated number after the "Polonaise" from "Mignon." She injected a high note that to judge from the sound, might be described as a B "flat and a half." But a good deal of the soprano singing was delectable nevertheless, and her portrayal of the dainty heroine had vivacity and charm.

Of course, Signor Ruffo made much of the "Largo al Factotum" - one of his war horses. And whenever he was on the stage he held the attention of the audience not only by reason of his singing, but through the comic energy of his acting.

Mario Chamlee made a good Almaviva, though he evidently has not had much experience in drinking Spanish wines, if one may judge from his second act entrance. Adamo Didur was a highly amusing Basilio. Pompilio Malatesta repeated his excellent embodiment of Dr. Bartolo, Marie Mattfield as Berta, Reschiglian as Fiorello and Pietro Audisio as the official gave satisfaction. And Gennaro Papi conducted with spirit.



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