[Met Performance] CID:85080
Guillaume Tell [William Tell] {22} Metropolitan Opera House: 11/12/1923.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 12, 1923
In Italian


GUILLAUME TELL [WILLIAM TELL] {22}
Rossini-Jouy/Bis/Marrast

Guillaume Tell..........Giuseppe Danise
Mathilde................Elisabeth Rethberg
Arnold..................Giovanni Martinelli
Walter..................José Mardones
Gesler..................Adamo Didur
Melcthal................Italo Picchi
Hedwige.................Marion Telva
Jemmy...................Nina Morgana
Fisherman...............Max Bloch
Leuthold................Millo Picco
Rodolphe................Angelo Badà
Dance...................Florence McNally
Dance...................Jessie York
Dance...................Rita De Leporte
Dance...................Jessie Rogge

Conductor...............Gennaro Papi

Director................Samuel Thewman
Set designer............Vittorio Rota
Costume designer........Gretel Urban
Choreographer...........August Berger
Translation by unknown

[The Overture was played before Act II.]

William Tell received five performances this season.

Review of W. J. Henderson in the Herald

Metropolitan Opens Its Second Week With 'William Tell'

Danise Has the Title Role in Performance of General Excellence.

The second week of the season at the Metropolitan Opera House began last night with one of the old operas revived last winter by Mr. Gatti-Casazza. The work was Rossini's "William Tell," which musical historians used to denominate the composer's masterpiece, possibly because it was the opera on which he bestowed the greatest amount of effort and for which he had the greatest hopes. Recent years have found public as well as commentators generally agreed that "Il Barbiere di Siviglia," written with incredible speed (probably because Donizetti said Rossini was so lazy) is the most admirable product of the pen that remained idle after the sorrowful failure of "William Tell."

But because of its good choruses and effective ensembles, as well as the opportunities offered by the role of Arnold to a tenor with a robust voice, the opera has had intermittent and sometimes brilliant reappearances. The revival of last winter at the Metropolitan was received with no small favor. It is an open secret that the impresario is a firm believer in the artistic value of the opera, and that is probably the reason why he gives it again this season.

There were several new faces in last evening's cast. Miss Rethberg sang Mathilde in place of Miss Ponselle. Mme. Nina Morgana had the role of Jemmy, Tell's son, impersonated last winter by Mme. Sundelius, and Miss Telva was Miss Perini's successor as Hedwig, Tell's wife. The men were generally the same. Mr. Danise was the William Tell, Mr. Martinelli the Arnoldo. Mr. Mardones the Walter Furst and Mr. Didur the tyrant Gessler.

The performance was one of general rather than particular excellence. Neither Mr. Danise nor Mr. Martinelli was in command of his best quality of tone, and this threw a rather heavy burden of responsibility on the women of the cast. Miss Rethberg's fine voice was heard with pleasure in the music of Matilde, and she brought to the rôle the added charm of youth and prepossessing appearance. Mme. Morgana's Jemmy was commendable, but not of great distinction. She sang well, and her slight shortcomings were in the histrionic requirements of the part. Miss Telva permitted Hedwig to lapse into comparative obscurity. The chorus sang admirably and there was good dancing by the ballet. Mr. Papi conducted, and the popular overture was played after the first act.



Added Index Entries for Subjects and Names


Back to short citation(s).