[Met Performance] CID:86160
Roméo et Juliette {129} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/30/1924.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 30, 1924


ROMÉO ET JULIETTE {129}

Roméo...................Armand Tokatyan
Juliette................Queena Mario
Frère Laurent...........Léon Rothier
Stéphano................Raymonde Delaunois
Mercutio................Gustav Schützendorf
Benvolio................Giordano Paltrinieri
Gertrude................Henriette Wakefield
Capulet.................William Gustafson
Tybalt..................Rafaelo Díaz
Pâris...................Millo Picco
Grégorio................Paolo Ananian
Duke of Verona..........Louis D'Angelo

Conductor...............Louis Hasselmans

Review of Theodore Stearns in the New YorkTelegram

QUEENA MARIO IS IDEAL JULIETTE

Gets More Than Usual Coloratura Prima Donna Out of Role at Metropolitan

GIRLISH AS WELL AS TRAGIC

Tokatyan, Substituting for Edward Johnson as Romeo, in Lovely Voice in Balcony Scene

Owing to a slight cold Edward Johnson was replaced by Tokatyan in the role of Romeo at the performance of 'Romeo et Juliette" last night at the Metropolitan. Tokatyan has a lovely voice and in the balcony scene it was full of youthful appeal. Queena Mario was the Juliette, and because Queena Mario represents what thousands of young American singers would like to be - an arrived member of our greatest grand opera organization - she deserves analysis. Furthermore, I believe she can stand it.

I am told she comes from Akron, Ohio, and that she has worked hard - unflinchingly. That is her first asset. As Juliette Miss Mario was ideal in face and figure. Her tone production and phrasing were exquisite and, furthermore, she sensed the meaning of Shakespeare's love-heroine. That is to say, she was girlish as well as tragic and she made out of the part more than the usual coloratura, prima donna role.

Miss Mario acts but does not overact, and yet were she to achieve more simplicity of gesture she would be nearer in her evident dramatic ideal. Like Lillian Gish, Queena Mario is the true ingénue type that poets, librettists, and composers have dreamed of ever since the idea of "ingénue type" came into vogue in grand opera. In the first act this - shall we say - Lillian Gish over-daintiness- was charming, but later on, while she felt and acted the coming tragedy, that restless charm was still too evidently there. It is true of both of these gifted young actresses that greater simplicity would enhance their art.



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