[Met Performance] CID:86670
Tristan und Isolde {162} Metropolitan Opera House: 03/5/1924.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
March 5, 1924


TRISTAN UND ISOLDE {162}
Wagner-Wagner

Tristan.................Curt Taucher
Isolde..................Florence Easton
Kurwenal................Friedrich Schorr
Brangäne................Karin Branzell
King Marke..............Michael Bohnen
Melot...................Arnold Gabor
Sailor's Voice..........Angelo Badà
Shepherd................Rafaelo Díaz
Steersman...............Louis D'Angelo

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

Director................Samuel Thewman
Set designer............Joseph Urban
Costume designer........Mathilde Castel-Bert

Tristan und Isolde received two performances this season.

Review of R. M. Kness in Musical America

Notable 'Tristan und Isolde'

The reentry of "Tristan und Isolde" into the Metropolitan's repertoire on Wednesday evening of last week was an event to gladden Wagner-lovers. Mr. Gatti-Casazza assembled a rarely excellent cast for the occasion. The orchestral reading, though it sometimes seemed to be merciless upon the voices in climaxes, was unusually fine under Mr. Bodanzky's just baton. Of not least importance, Joseph Urban's stage pictures, new several seasons ago, glowed impressively as of yore.

Florence Easton was the Isolde - a rarely human one - who poured pathos, instead of a more common vitriolic quality, into her long scene with Brangäne in the first act. She revealed an exceptionally beautiful voice in the love scene of the second act and the noble "Liebestod." Opposite her stood a capable Brangäne - that of Karin Branzell, the new Swedish singer - who made her first local appearance in the part. Her voice possesses a plushy quality, united to trumpet-like volume of tone, though it is a relatively high mezzo-soprano rather than a contralto. Further acquaintance with the part should make it one of Mme. Branzell's most impressive achievements.

Curt Taucher was the Tristan - a manly and physically credible, though not especially romantic, figure. His singing has, however, gained amazingly in freedom and resonance since he was heard here last year, and he exceeded any German tenor of recent years in his success with the second-act music. More restraint would have added artistry to his work in the last act scene of delirium. Michael Bohnen was an impressive King Marke, phrasing and coloring his music with superb skill.

Friedrich Schorr, the second newcomer in the cast, gave fine, open tones and virile timbre of voice to the music of Kurvenal. He is an important acquisition. Arnold Gabor appeared for the first time here in the subsidiary part of Melot. Others who did well by minor parts were Rafaelo Diaz as the Shepherd, Louis D'Angelo as the Steersman and Angelo Bada, who sang the off-stage music of the Sailor excellently. The choral contribution in Act I was lusty and in good tempo and tone. The stage action, under Samuel Thewman's hand, was smooth.



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