[Met Performance] CID:88310
Il Barbiere di Siviglia {124} Metropolitan Opera House: 11/27/1924.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 27, 1924


IL BARBIERE DI SIVIGLIA {124}
Rossini-Sterbini

Figaro..................Giuseppe De Luca
Rosina..................Elvira de Hidalgo
Count Almaviva..........Mario Chamlee
Dr. Bartolo.............Pompilio Malatesta
Don Basilio.............Adamo Didur
Berta...................Marie Mattfeld
Fiorello................Vincenzo Reschiglian
Sergeant................Giordano Paltrinieri

Conductor...............Gennaro Papi

Director................Armando Agnini
Set designer............Mario Sala

Il Barbiere di Siviglia received three performances this season.

[In the Lesson Scene Elvira de Hidalgo sang the Shadow Song from Dinorah and Al pensar en el dueño de mis amores from Las Hijas del Zebedeo (Chapí).]

Review (unsigned) in the Tribune

Mme. De Hidalgo Heard in "Barber of Seville"

Spanish Soprano Is Pleasing; Made Metropolitan Debut 14 Years Ago

"The Barber of Seville," now 105 years old and still, apparently, going strong, made its first appearance of the season at the Metropolitan Opera House last night - not, however, with Feodor Chaliapin, who was slated to sing Don Basilio for the first time here since 1907-08. The Russian basso, who was suffering from a cold, gave way to Adamo Didur, as the familiar inserted slips told the audience, and interest, in regard to novelty, centered on the Rosina of the evening, Elvia de Hidalgo.

This was practically a debut, but the Spanish soprano's actual Metropolitan debut had been in March, 1910, in the same role. Heralded as the youngest opera singer then extant, she had a voice which impressed reviewers as fresh, but small and immature. But that was fourteen years ago. Her present-day voice seemed, on the whole, a very pleasing coloratura soprano, smooth and fluent, if not one of large volume, able to round out ornaments and ride the loftiest notes, such as the high F in "Una voice poco fa" to the marked delight of the spectators. There was some hardness of tone, with a twang or two in a few lower notes, but with vivacity and a wealth of gesture Mme. De Hidalgo seemed very well off in this part, and made a very favorable impression.

The other roles were in familiar hands. Mr. de Luca as the Barber, Mr. Chamlee, in good voice, as the Count, Mr. Malatesta as Bartolo, Marie Mattfeld, Messers. Reschiglian and Paltrinieri with Mr. Papi conducting. As often the humorous element was played up for all it was worth, with some suggestions of the custard-pie comedy of filmdom, but it gave the large audience an amusing evening.



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