[Met Performance] CID:89100
Lohengrin {340} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/24/1925.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 24, 1925


LOHENGRIN {340}

Lohengrin...............Curt Taucher
Elsa....................Maria Müller
Ortrud..................Karin Branzell
Telramund...............Friedrich Schorr
King Heinrich...........Gustav Schützendorf
Herald..................Carl Schlegel
Page....................Mary Bonetti
Page....................Louise Hunter
Page....................Laura Robertson
Page....................Charlotte Ryan

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

Review of W. J. Henderson in the Sun

Miss Müller Sings Elsa

The sweetmeats of opera were liberally distributed at the Metropolitan on Saturday when "Lucia" was sing in the afternoon and "Lohengrin" in the evening. Mme. Galli-Curci, whose voice continued to show signs of fatigue, delivered many passages at a pitch considerably at variance with that of the orchestra and, on the whole, presented a colorless and apathetic picture on Donizetti's heroine. The honors of the afternoon were won by Beniamino Gigli, whose Edgardo had beauty of voice and skill in song. Mr. de Luca was the Enrico.

In Wagner's music drama Miss Maria Müller, soprano, made her second appearance with the company, singing Elsa. This young woman is a pleasing addition to the company. Her voice is not a great one, but it has beauty and freshness. She acted and sang Elsa with feeling and intelligence. It is gratifying to find a young singer with so much stage instinct. Her action is almost always well conceived and discreetly executed. At any rate it has been so in the two important parts she has had and, naturally, one expects that it will be so in others. Her Elsa was one of the most sympathetic we have had in recent years.

Of the others in the cast the foremost was Friedrich Schorr, whose Telramund was admirable. Mr. Taucher as Lohengrin, Mme. Branzell as Ortrud and Mr. Schützendorf as the King were others engaged in the performance which, as a whole, was characterized by much untunefulness, ragged and false singing and coarse orchestral playing. From curious misunderstandings between the conductor and the prima donna the inference might be drawn that she had not rehearsed her role. But doubtless she had and was suffering from nervousness.



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