[Met Performance] CID:90130
Parsifal {108} Matinee ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 04/10/1925.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
April 10, 1925 Matinee


PARSIFAL {108}

Parsifal................Curt Taucher
Kundry..................Nanny Larsén-Todsen
Amfortas................Clarence Whitehill
Gurnemanz...............Michael Bohnen
Klingsor................Adamo Didur
Titurel.................William Gustafson
Voice...................Marion Telva
First Esquire.................Ellen Dalossy
Second Esquire.................Louise Hunter
Third Esquire.................George Meader
Fourth Esquire.................Max Altglass
First Knight..................Angelo Badŕ
Second Knight..................Carl Schlegel
Flower Maidens: Marcella Röseler, Grace Anthony, Raymonde Delaunois,
Laura Robertson, Charlotte Ryan, Marion Telva

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

Review of Edward Cushing in the Brooklyn Eagle

There was a performance of "Parsifal" at the opera house yesterday afternoon before a capacity audience. Messrs. Taucher, Bohnen and Whitehill again undertook their familiar roles in Wagner's festival play, and in Mme. Larsen-Todsen the Metropolitan had a new Kundry. The Klingsor was Adamo Didur and Mr. Bodanzky conducted.

Mme. Larsen-Todsen's Kundry was an admirable achievement. There have been several seasons now in which the Kundrys of the Metropolitan were not all that one could ask. Mme. Matzenauer certainly had not the physical attributes of the perfect siren, nor did she sing the music with the desirable ease of tone production and facility of mood projection. Mme. Larsen-Todsen was most presentable in the second act. We figured, watching her, that Parsifal's steadfastness was somewhat of an act of heroism - a phase of the drama which never before had quite convinced us. Additionally, Mme. Larsen-Todsen sang the music with inner feeling and emphasis, with finer logic of tone coloring than she has displayed in any roles to date, save only her Isolde.

Praise is due Mr. Taucher for singing the long and trying role of Parsifal in spite of illness. His voice revealed no untoward strain, and if, as the rumor went, it was not he who stood silently through the later scene of the first act, the substitution of an "extra" produced no loss of illusion. Both Mr. Whitehill and Mr. Bohnen were in good voice. The Flower Maidens sang less expertly than is possible, but for this Mr. Bodanzky atoned by the quality of his orchestral reading.



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