[Met Performance] CID:90240
Aida {302} Metropolitan Opera House: 04/17/1925.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
April 17, 1925


AIDA {302}
Giuseppe Verdi--Antonio Ghislanzoni

Aida....................Elisabeth Rethberg
Radamès.................Giacomo Lauri-Volpi
Amneris.................Karin Branzell
Amonasro................Michael Bohnen
Ramfis..................José Mardones
King....................Louis D'Angelo
Messenger...............Giordano Paltrinieri
Priestess...............Charlotte Ryan
Dance...................Florence Rudolph

Conductor...............Tullio Serafin

Review of W. J. Henderson in the Sun

Farewells Sung at the Opera

'Aida,' With Miss Rethberg, Presented at Closing Night of the Subscription

Say au revoir, but not goodbye, and say it with song. That was the sentiment loudly expressed by a large audience at the Metropolitan Opera House last evening. It was a night of final appearance, the closing night of the subscription. For this momentous occasion Impresario Gatti-Casazza chose the popular "Aida." Best loved of all Verdi's creations, except perhaps the inscrutable "Rigoletto," inscrutable because critical acumen continues to fail miserably to discern the nature of its potent charm.

With "Aida" the case is different. Any type in operatic observation can tell you why an opera exotic in character, brilliant in every page, bristling with vocal effects, gorgeous with ballet and procession and filled with the dread of tragedy should hold its grip on the public. The performance of last evening was like unto others which had been given in the Metropolitan this season and it was a meritorious one.

The farewellers were all favorites of the habitual operagoers. Miss Rethberg, whose impersonation of the dusky slave has grown to artistic importance, sang with her lovely voice and received tumults of applause. Karin Branzell has this season added herself to the list of Amnerises who have made the choice of Radames as difficult as that of Paris. She repeated her admirable singing of the part and was amply rewarded by her auditors.

Mr. Lauri-Volpi was the Radames and for him, too, there were hundreds of warm palms. Mr. Mardones pontificated in his well known fatherly manner as the high Priest and called Radames a "traditore" in no uncertain accents. The Amonasro was Mr. Bohnen, who made a vigorous Ethiopian king and earned his full share of the evening's glory. The conductor was Tullio Serafin.



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