[Met Performance] CID:91580
Andrea Chénier {30} Metropolitan Opera House: 12/16/1925.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 16, 1925


ANDREA CHÉNIER {30}
U. Giordano-Illica

Andrea Chénier..........Beniamino Gigli
Maddalena...............Rosa Ponselle
Carlo Gérard............Titta Ruffo
Bersi...................Ellen Dalossy
Countess di Coigny......Ina Bourskaya
Abbé....................Giordano Paltrinieri
Fléville................Lawrence Tibbett
L'Incredibile...........Angelo Badà
Roucher.................Millo Picco
Mathieu.................Adamo Didur
Madelon.................Marion Telva
Dumas...................Louis D'Angelo
Fouquier Tinville.......Paolo Ananian
Schmidt.................Pompilio Malatesta
Major-domo..............Vincenzo Reschiglian

Conductor...............Giuseppe Bamboschek

Director................Samuel Thewman
Set designer............Triangle Studio
Set designer............James Fox
Costume designer........Triangle Studio
Costume designer........Mathilde Castel-Bert
Choreographer...........Rosina Galli
[Triangle Studio designed the sets for Acts I and II, J. Fox those for Acts III and IV.]

Andrea Chénier received five performances this season.

Review signed J. A. H. in Musical America

Enter, Titta Ruffo

Although Titta Ruffo had sung the previous week in a benefit performance of "Gioconda," his first appearance at a regular subscription performance was as Gerard in the year's first hearing of Giordano's "Andrea Chenier" on Wednesday evening. Rosa Ponselle sang Madeleine and Beniamino Gigli, the title-role. The minor parts were capably assumed by Mmes. Bourskaya, Dalossy and Telva, and Messrs. Tibbett, Paltrinieri, Reschiglian, Didur, Bada, Picco, Ananian, D'Angelo and Malatesta. Giuseppe Bamboschek conducted.

The singing of the individual artists was, for the most part, good, with honors going to Mr. Gigli. The "Improvviso" in the first act was beautifully sung, even if Mr. Gigli was somewhat over-conscious of the audience, and the tenor's tone in the [start] of the final scene was of almost unearthly beauty. Mr. Ruffo was clapped and cheered after everything he sang, and "Nemico della Patria" interrupted the performance for several minutes. Miss Ponselle gave a fine account of herself and her voice sounded particularly well. Her dramatic scene at the end of the third act was particularly moving. Mr. Bamboschek conducted strenuously and much of the time with violence.



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