[Met Performance] CID:91760
Tha´s {38} American Academy of Music, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: 12/29/1925.

(Review)


Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
December 29, 1925


THA¤S {38}
Massenet-Gallet

Tha´s...................Maria Jeritza
AthanaŰl................Clarence Whitehill
Nicias..................Armand Tokatyan
PalÚmon.................Louis D'Angelo
Crobyle.................Grace Anthony
Myrtale.................Minnie Egener
Albine..................Kathleen Howard
Servant.................Arnold Gabor
Dance...................Florence Rudolph
Dance...................Giuseppe Bonfiglio

Conductor...............Louis Hasselmans

Director................Wilhelm Von Wymetal
Set designer............Joseph Urban
Costume designer........Gretel Urban
Choreographer...........Rosina Galli

Tha´s received two performances this season.

Review of Linton Martin in the Philadelphia Inquirer

JERITZA IN 'THAIS' OFFERING AT OPERA

Repeats Vivid Characterization with Whitehill and Tokatyan in Cast

It was pre-eminently Maria Jertiza's evening when "Thais" was given in the Academy last night by the Metropolitan Opera Company as the sixth performance in the current series. Since the Viennese prima donna appeared in the same part here the two previous seasons in succession, there is no longer any novelty about her vocal and dramatic characterization of the "sinner-saint" of ancient Alexandria in Massenet's sugary setting of the famous Anatole France story. But it does retain its appeal for many, largely though Jeritza's force of personality in the part so closely linked with the superb art of Mary Garden on past occasions.

As at the presentations of "Thais" last season and the season before that, Jeritza's principal associates in the cast were Clarence Whitehill as the monk, Athanael, and Armand Tokatyan as the sybarite, Nicias. Both were inevitably overshadowed by Jeritza, who has her own ideas about playing the part and singing the score, and this contrast was emphasized because neither Mr. Whitehill's voice nor Mr. Tokatyan appeared to be in the best condition. Mr. Whitehill's voice more than once exhibiting a distressing hoarseness that sounded as though he were suffering from a cold. His performance dramatically was sincere and artistic, and Mr. Tokatyan was sufficiently ingratiating in manner. But the vocal exuberance was limited to Jertiza, and her acting was not only exuberant but at times excessive.

There was a most elaborate and colorful ballet in the second act, led by Frances Rudolph and Giuseppe Bonfiglio. Louis Hasselmans conducted with zeal worthy of a score of substance, and the intermezzo of the "Meditation" was received with approval.



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