[Met Performance] CID:92150
Roméo et Juliette {137} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/27/1926.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 27, 1926


ROMÉO ET JULIETTE {137}

Roméo...................Beniamino Gigli
Juliette................Queena Mario
Frère Laurent...........Léon Rothier
Stéphano................Raymonde Delaunois
Mercutio................Millo Picco
Benvolio................Max Altglass
Gertrude................Henriette Wakefield
Capulet.................William Gustafson
Tybalt..................Angelo Badà
Pâris...................Vincenzo Reschiglian
Grégorio................Paolo Ananian
Duke of Verona..........Louis D'Angelo

Conductor...............Louis Hasselmans

Review of W. J. Henderson in the New York Sun

'Romeo et Juliette' Opera Sung at Metropolitan

The performance of Gounod's "Romeo et Juliette" at the Metropolitan Opera House last night was not one to wring the heartstrings of sensitive natures. True, there were a few sniffs, but their emotional origin was more sardonic and of a sterner nature than that associated with tears.

That ubiquitous wrench in the operatic machinery, "sudden indisposition," struck down Miss Bori, who was slated for her usual role, and thus Miss Queena Mario and Mr. Gigli appeared in the title roles. Mr. Bada as Tybalt, Mr. Picco as Mercutio and Mr. Rothier as Friar Laurent, were other well known artists in familiar roles.

It was difficult to cast a tender eye on the quality of last night's offering. Mr. Hasselmans, who conducted, imparted a number of soporific qualities to a score which at best is never exciting and seldom impassioned. Perhaps it is not quite fair to characterize the presentation as slovenly, but a lack of cohesiveness, of warmth, of vitality, in the vocal ensemble rendered much of the work spiritless and some of it downright dull. Miss Queena Mario was generally successful in her efforts, notably in the final scene. And her appearance is always convincing. Mr. Gigli sang lyrically, artistically, and with fine restraint, but not with those silver tones edged with velvet so often associated with his vocal fame. Incidentally, Mr. Gatti's moon poured its radiance on the balcony with all the effulgent glow of the midnight sun, and as has been suggested above, M. Hasselman's personally conducted interpretation of Gounod's score sounded like love's lullaby.



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