[Met Performance] CID:92900
Petrouchka {12}
La Bohème {232}
Metropolitan Opera House: 03/22/1926.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
March 22, 1926


PETROUCHKA {12}

Petrouchka..............Adolph Bolm
Ballerina...............Florence Rudolph
Moor....................Giuseppe Bonfiglio
Charlatan...............Ottokar Bartik
Merchant................Ludwig Burgstaller
Street Dancers: Mollie Friedenthal, Rita De Leporte
Gypsies: Lilyan Ogden, Jessie Rogge

Conductor...............Tullio Serafin


LA BOHÈME {232}

Mimì....................Lucrezia Bori
Rodolfo.................Giacomo Lauri-Volpi
Musetta.................Louise Hunter
Marcello................Antonio Scotti
Schaunard...............Adamo Didur
Colline.................Léon Rothier
Benoit..................Paolo Ananian
Alcindoro...............Pompilio Malatesta
Parpignol...............Max Altglass
Sergeant................Vincenzo Reschiglian

Conductor...............Gennaro Papi

Review of W. J. Henderson in the Sun

Double Bill Ably Sung at the Metropolitan

Mr. Gatti's extensive experiments in double bills continues with unabated vigor! "Petroushka" and "La Bohème" were the offerings at the Metropolitan Opera House last evening. Both productions have been presented a number of times this season and perhaps the usual clichés are in order for the daily epitaph on another operatic night. But then again, perhaps a little vernal enthusiasm is permissible. Particularly when Puccini's melodious opera of Parisian sentiment and love in an attic probably enjoyed its best performance of the season.

Just what infused the ensemble with so much buoyancy, charm and good singing last night remains an operatic mystery, for the cast was one of those registered, trade marked affairs adorned with familiar names. The principals were Miss Bori as Mimi and Mr. Lauri-Volpi as Rodolfo. Vocally, and indeed in every other respect, they surpassed themselves last evening.

Mr. Lauri-Volpi has been quaffing at the font of wisdom. His style and manner of delivery in the first act narrative were admirable. He used his voice with wise restraint and a skillful use of color. He clung tenaciously to some high notes and employed a few of them to lachrymose excess. But in general his tone was one of much beauty. Vocally, the performance marked his highest point of achievement, and he received an ovation from the audience.

Miss Bori, in admirable voice, was more charming than ever. Miss Hunter's Musetta, although inclined to make eyes at the conductor most of the time, remains a vivacious and satisfactory portrait, and Messrs. Didur, Scotti and Rothier were those irrepressible boys who found life in a garret more attractive than others have reported it to be.

The audience was a large and enthusiastic one. Stalwart men hurled bouquets at Miss Bori, large quantities of genuine tears were shed over Mimi's tragic demise, and an impressive portion of the audience remained to cheer the principals after the performance Mr. Papi conducted.

The performance of "Petrushka" was a good one. There were a few minor slips in the scene shifting, for which Mr. Stravinsky's music affords scant allowance. Miss Florence Rudolph, Mr. Bolm, Mr. Bonfiglio and Mr. Bartik were, respectively, the Ballerina, Petrushka, the Moor and the Old Showman. And Stravinsky's inimitable score, with its ingenious blend of elements at once amusingly mechanical and bitingly human, seemed to be winning a modest, but secure, position among operatic audiences. Mr. Serafin conducted.



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