[Met Performance] CID:92950
Tristan und Isolde {170} Matinee ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 03/26/1926.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
March 26, 1926 Matinee


TRISTAN UND ISOLDE {170}

Tristan.................Rudolf Laubenthal
Isolde..................Nanny Larsén-Todsen
Kurwenal................Friedrich Schorr
Brangäne................Karin Branzell
King Marke..............Michael Bohnen
Melot...................Arnold Gabor
Sailor's Voice..........Max Bloch
Shepherd................George Meader
Steersman...............James Wolfe

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

.Review signed J. SA. H. in Musical America

Wagner Cycle Ends

With a magnificent performance of "Tristan and Isolde" the matinèe Wagner Cycle came to an end on Friday afternoon. The opera, having its third performance of the season, was interpreted by Nanny Larsen-Todsen and Rudolf Laubenthal in the title-roles, with Karin Branzell as Brangäne, Michael Bohnen as King Mark, Friedrich Schorr as Kurvenal, Arnold Gabor as Melot, George Meader as the Shepherd, James Wolfe as the Steersman and Max Bloch as the Young Sailor. Artur Bodanzky conducted.

The Prelude dragged and was otherwise ineffective, the balance of power, so supremely important, not being nicely kept. Once the curtain was up, however, the performance moved with a finish and a zest that has not often been equaled. Mme. Larsen-Todsen was best in the first act, her dramatic conception of the part being in some respects unique and at all times interesting. She was more than ably seconded by Mme. Branzell. The Warning from the Tower was a piece of superb vocalization, the best, perhaps of the afternoon, and Brangäne's little bits of business in the first act were intelligently thought out and delicately done. These two Nordics make a strong combination the secret of which would seem to lie in mutual respect for the other's art.

Mr. Laubenthal, more at home in the part than at first, made Tristan a personable figure and sang exceedingly well. The beginning of the third act he succeeded in making interesting. Mr. Schorr put Kurwenal back where he belongs and yet did not repress him unnecessarily. Mr. Bohnen's Mark was somewhat too youthful in appearance, but he sang his scene well. The remaining parts were capably filled. Mr. Urban's ship is still such as was never on land or sea, and the lighting left much to be desired, but these are minor matters in face of such splendid singing and acting.



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