[Met Performance] CID:93160
Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg {162} Metropolitan Opera House: 04/9/1926.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
April 9, 1926


DIE MEISTERSINGER VON NÜRNBERG {162}

Hans Sachs..............Michael Bohnen
Eva.....................Maria Müller
Walther von Stolzing....Rudolf Laubenthal
Magdalene...............Marion Telva
David...................George Meader
Beckmesser..............Gustav Schützendorf
Pogner..................Léon Rothier
Kothner.................Carl Schlegel [Last performance]
Vogelgesang.............Max Bloch
Nachtigall..............Louis D'Angelo
Ortel...................Paolo Ananian
Zorn....................Angelo Badà
Moser...................Max Altglass
Eisslinger..............Giordano Paltrinieri
Foltz...................James Wolfe
Schwarz.................William Gustafson
Night Watchman..........Arnold Gabor

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

Review of W. J. Henderson in the Sun

'Die Meistersinger' Well Done

Final Performance of Opera for This Season Delights Huge Audience at Metropolitan

The season's fifth and final performance of "Die Meistersinger" delighted a large audience at the Metropolitan Opera House last evening. Vocally, the season has witnessed better performances of Wagner's work. But the ensemble, the spirit and the mellow buoyancy of last evening's presentation were admirable.

A thirty minute intermission between the second and third acts aroused many rumors. Mr. Bohnen suffered a temporary loss of voice in his dressing room and there was much anxiety behind the scenes. Simple remedies quickly applied, however, saved the evening, and after some delay the performance proceeded smoothly enough.

His impersonation of Sachs last night was surprisingly mellow and nobly proportioned. It is true that at times he indulged in exaggerated gestures and unnecessary theatrical display, and occasionally, perhaps, in emphatic moments his Sachs resembled a jovial paternal president of the Nurnberg chamber of commerce. But his performance as a whole was distinguished for his fine grasp of mood and dignified revelation of a noble character. Sturdier and less poetic than some other interpretations perhaps, but refreshingly interesting on that account,

Miss Müller emitted some shrill notes. But she was a lovely and charming figure to gaze upon. In the more congenial registers of her voice she sang well. The presence of the personable lovers satisfying optic nerves as well as aural centers provides another cause for congratulation. Mr. Meader's David remains the superb portrait it always has been and the rest of the principals, with Mr. Schützendorf's convincing Beckmesser, provided valuable contributions to the ensemble. Mr. Bodanzky, of course, conducted.

Near the close of an operatic season unprecedented for the variety and range of its offerings - the present season has witnessed fifty complete productions, many of them presented half a dozen times - the management deserves praise for the faithful and admirable justice rendered in every department. To Wagner's immortal work certainly the production remains one of the most invigorating and satisfying in the house repertoire.



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