[Met Performance] CID:94300
Madama Butterfly {187}
Le Rossignol {6}
Matinee ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 11/25/1926.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 25, 1926 Matinee


MADAMA BUTTERFLY {187}

Cio-Cio-San.............Florence Easton
Pinkerton...............Giovanni Martinelli
Suzuki..................Marion Telva
Sharpless...............Antonio Scotti
Goro....................Angelo Badà
Bonze...................William Gustafson
Yamadori................Pompilio Malatesta
Kate Pinkerton..........Dorothea Flexer
Commissioner............Vincenzo Reschiglian
Yakuside................Paolo Quintina

Conductor...............Vincenzo Bellezza


In French

LE ROSSIGNOL {6}
Stravinsky-Stravinsky/Mitusov

Nightingale.............Marion Talley
Fisherman...............Alfio Tedesco
Cook....................Ina Bourskaya
Emperor.................Adamo Didur
Chamberlain.............Louis D'Angelo
Bonze...................James Wolfe
Death...................Henriette Wakefield
Japanese Envoys: Max Altglass, Millo Picco, Giordano Paltrinieri
Lantern Servants: Louise Lerch, Mary Bonetti, Max Altglass

Conductor...............Tullio Serafin

Director................Samuel Thewman
Designer................Serge Soudeikine

Le Rossignol received three performances this season.

Review signed M. W. in the New York Herald Tribune

Stravinsky Fantasy Given as 'Desert" After Opera 'Feast'

"Madama Butterfly" Given With "Le Rossignol" for Thanksgiving Performance at the Metropolitan

Stravinsky's little Russo-Chinese masterpiece, "Le Rossignol," was served to the Thanksgiving matinee audience at the Metropolitan yesterday as a bonne-bouche after the whisky-and-soda of "Madama Butterfly" and in place of the more solid and customary feast of "Parsifal."

Sitting through the entirety of Puccini's brief tragedy provides an interlude impossible for the reviewer on a more crowded non-holiday. Through the efficacies of a poignant interpretation by Miss Easton in the title role, and the infallible pathos inherent in the libretto, it seemed a more emotional experience than any hardened operagoer might wish to confess. Hence, the delicious fantasy devised by Hans Anderson, augmented by Stravinsky in his best, if not his most characteristic, style, and garnished with gay loveliness by Soudeikine, was curative in its application and gratefully received.

The song of the Fisherman from his bark on the shore of the deep forest still seems quite the most beautiful music which Stravinsky has written, and, although yesterday Mr. Tedesco's voice from the orchestra pit did not convey his share of that beauty as deftly as Mr. Errolle of the original cast, it was very difficult to mar.

Marion Talley, hidden at Mr. Serafin's side, lifted her voice in the cruelly-exacting loveliness of the Nightingale's music with more effort than is remembered in previous performances. She negotiated the difficult intervals and fantastic flights with commendable accuracy and pitch, but with a sense of heaviness, as if the bird had dined too well in the porcelain palace this Thanksgiving Day. Mme. Bourskaya, as the sagacious cook repeated the excellence of her impersonation, as did Mr. Didur in the wooden stateliness of the Emperor. Mr. D'Angelo substituted for Mr. Schützendorf, who was indisposed, as the Chamberlain, without detriment to the part, and Miss Bonetti and Messrs. Altglass, Paltrinieri, Picco and Wolfe were the remaining cast. Mr. Serafin applied his devoted baton with his usual skill, imagination and enthusiasm.

There were minor changes in the "Butterfly" cast. Mr. Bada returning with colorful benefit to the role of Goro, Miss Dorethea Flexer lending what sweetness she could to the ineptitudes of Kate Pinkerton, and Marion Telva contriving a sympathetic and touching Suzuki. Mr. Scotti was, as usual, the delectable Sharpless, and Mr. Martinelli sang Pinkerton's fatuous protestations. Mr. Bellezza was the conductor.



Added Index Entries for Subjects and Names


Back to short citation(s).