[Met Performance] CID:94790
Turandot {6} Metropolitan Opera House: 12/30/1926.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 30, 1926


TURANDOT {6}

Turandot................Maria Jeritza
Calāf...................Giacomo Lauri-Volpi
Lių.....................Martha Attwood
Timur...................Pavel Ludikar
Ping....................Giuseppe De Luca
Pang....................Angelo Badā
Pong....................Alfio Tedesco
Emperor Altoum..........Max Altglass
Mandarin................George Cehanovsky
Maid....................Louise Lerch
Maid....................Dorothea Flexer

Conductor...............Tullio Serafin

Review signed M. W. in the New York Tribune

Jeritza Scores Triumph in Puccini's 'Turandot'

Entire Company, Including Serafin Conducting, Electrifies Audience at Metropolitan

An enormous and electrically responsive audience at the Metropolitan last night heard the fifth performance of Puccini's "Turandot," with the original cast headed by Maria Jeritza. The performance itself approximated the best hearing which the work has had.

Everyone was on tiptoe; the profuse vitality and excitement of the score communicated itself to all the participants with gratifying result. Mme. Jeritza, commanding vast reserves of tonal splendor and physical magnificence, strode though her glamorous role, mistress of the stage. Mr. Lauri-Volpi, singing better and better as this opera piles up the score, was at his best last evening. Ping, Pang and Pong, in the hands of Messrs. De Luca, Bada and Tedesco, were marvels of animation; Martha Attwood softened the edge of her Liu's inadequacies and gave a sympathetic reading of the music; lesser parts profited by the efforts of Messrs. Altglass, Cehanovsky and Ludikar, Mmes. Lerch and Flexer. Mr. Serafin conducted as if this was his single chance to show what he and Puccini were worth in the artistic world.

And as a fitting climax to all this beneficence a black and white feline condescended to take a nonchalant but effective part in the last act. Having put everyone in an ebullient humor Signor Gatto (not Gatti; he is never so indiscreet) withdrew under the platform beneath the silver feet of Jeritza, who from then on mingled her histrionic vituperations with a very human inclination to mirth. Could anything be more propitious, from a theatrical point of view?



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