[Met Performance] CID:9560
Die Walküre {43} Metropolitan Opera House: 02/6/1891.

(Debut: Adeline Epstein, Anna Fields, Selma Kört-Kronold, Bella Bauman, Anna Mantel
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
February 6, 1891


DIE WALKÜRE {43}
Wagner-Wagner

Brünnhilde..............Antonia Mielke
Siegmund................Heinrich Gudehus
Sieglinde...............Marie Jahn
Wotan...................Emil Fischer
Fricka..................Marie Ritter-Götze
Hunding.................Conrad Behrens
Gerhilde................Adeline Epstein [Debut]
Grimgerde...............Anna Fields [Debut]
Helmwige................Selma Kört-Kronold [Debut]
Ortlinde................Bella Bauman [Debut]
Rossweisse..............Anna Mantel [Debut]
Schwertleite............Lena Göttich
Siegrune................Marie Ritter-Götze
Waltraute...............Charlotte Huhn

Conductor...............Anton Seidl

Director................Theodore Habelmann
Set Designer............Josef Hoffmann
Set Designer............William Schaeffer
Set Designer............Gaspar Maeder
Costume Designer........Carl Doepler
Costume Designer........Henry Dazian

Die Walküre received four performances this season.

[At the time of her debut Kört-Kronold was listed in company programs as Selma Kört.]

Unsigned review in The New York Times

METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE.

It may be recollected that at the beginning of the season THE TIMES expressed the opinion that Edmund C. Stanton had got together for the present season, at the Metropolitan Opera House, one of the best all-around companies ever assembled here for German opera. Last night's performance was one of the finest demonstrations yet given of the justice of this opinion. It is not too much to say that, taking it all in all, it was the finest performance of "Die Walküre" ever given in this city. It was splendid in its dramatic forcefulness, beautiful in its picturesqueness of aspect, and unequaled in its vocal excellence. We have had occasion to find fault frequently this season, but last night's performance was of a nature to disarm criticism, to drive cold reason behind the barriers of emotion, and convince the hearer that there are times when all things work together for the good of them that love genuine "dramma per musica."

Individual excellence was not especially prominent because there was so much of it. It began with the entrance of Herr Gudehus in the first act and continued till Herr Fischer made his exit at the close of the last scene. Gudehus is vocally by far the best Siegmund we have had, and his acting is thoroughly good, though not so noble as that of the wonderful old Niemann. But the latter could not sing, while Gudehus sang every measure finely, making the famous love song buoyant and bold, as the composer intended it to be.

Frau Mielke's Brünnhilde was a lovely performance, rounded and thoughtful in conception, direct and eloquent in execution. She sang admirably, her Valkyr's cry at the [beginning] of the second act electrifying the audience, and her subsequent work being charged with dignity and beauty. Frau Ritter-Götze's Fricka was superb. It was out and out the best interpretation of the rôle both vocally and dramatically ever seen here.

Fräulein Jahn was a satisfactory Sieglinde. She sang the music smoothly and commendably, and acted in a womanly manner. It is not necessary at this late day to commend Fischer's Wotan, but last night the popular basso struck a deeper note of passion and power than even he usually does, and his action was uncommonly full of significance. The Hunding of Behrens is the best thing that singer does, and last evening it was up to its mark. The choir of Valkyres was satisfactory, and the orchestra played like a band of virtuosi. Anton Seidl conducted.

The enthusiasm of the audience was aroused at the outset by the beautiful treatment of the great love duet at the hands of Gudehus and Fräulein Jahn, and the tenor's forcible declamation at the close of the scene brought the curtain down with a grand outburst of applause. The three artists who appeared in the first act were called out five times, and the applause did not cease until the conductor came forward to acknowledge the kindness of the auditors. The enthusiasm at the termination of the second act was of a similar kind and might have been even greater had not a slight mishap with one of the cloud drops marred the effect of the climax.



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