[Met Performance] CID:95770
Siegfried {136}
Ring Cycle [48]
Matinee ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 03/11/1927.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
March 11, 1927 Matinee


SIEGFRIED {136}
Der Ring des Nibelungen: Cycle [48]

Siegfried...............Rudolf Laubenthal
Brünnhilde..............Nanny Larsén-Todsen
Wanderer................Friedrich Schorr
Erda....................Karin Branzell
Mime....................Max Bloch
Alberich................Gustav Schützendorf
Fafner..................James Wolfe
Forest Bird.............Editha Fleischer

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

Review of Pitts Sanborn in the New York Telegram

'Siegfried' of the Cycle

Metropolitan's Matinee Wagner Series Reaches Third Member of the 'Ring' Tetralogy

A large audience turned out for "Siegfried" at the Metropolitan Opera House yesterday afternoon - the fourth performance in the matinee Wagner series. The woodland scherzo of "Der Ring des Nibelungen" had been given by Mr. Gatti-Casazza's company only once before this season. In that earlier representation the forest lad who has as grandsire the chief god of Valhalla and who bumptiously shatters that diety's spear was impersonated with rather startling effect by Walther Kirchhoff, the season's new and engaging tenor from Germany. Yesterday the role went instead to Rudolf Laubenthal, who had filled it here a year ago.

Mr. Laubenthal makes a good, if not precisely a great, young Siegfried. His singing yesterday was, in general, commendable and his red-gold curly bob proved the despair of the admiring onlookers on the distaff side of the congregation. Mme. Larsen-Todsen labored conscientiously and intelligently as Brünnhilde, but her voice sounded tired, and both her singing and her acting lacked something in decision and accent. Mr. Bloch, who at his best is an excellent Mime, properly abstained from those exaggerations which had recently marred his portrayal of the sinister dwarf.

The Wanderer's music Mr. Schorr always delivers with nobility of tone and style. Mr. Schützendorf made a capital Alberich; the singing of Mme. Fleischer as the Forest Bird was above the local standard for that cheering ornithological counselor. Mme. Branzell voiced the plaints of Erda tolerably and James Wolfe was heard as the talking dragon.

Mr. Bodanzky conducted with attention and spirit a performance that was over and done in record time. In fact, broader tempi, as well as less cutting of the score, would have added greatly to the impressiveness of the concluding scene, which, as written, is one of the supreme peaks in the entire range of the Wagner music drama.



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