[Met Performance] CID:96220
Aida {324} Metropolitan Opera House: 04/11/1927.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
April 11, 1927


AIDA {324}
Giuseppe Verdi--Antonio Ghislanzoni

Aida....................Maria Müller
Radamès.................Edward Johnson
Amneris.................Julia Claussen
Amonasro................Michael Bohnen
Ramfis..................Ezio Pinza
King....................Joseph Macpherson
Messenger...............Alfio Tedesco
Priestess...............Charlotte Ryan
Dance...................Rita De Leporte

Conductor...............Tullio Serafin

Review (partial) of W. J. Henderson in the New York Sun

Edward Johnson Sings in 'Aida'

Bohnen, Maria Müller, and Mme. Claussen Have Roles in Presentation at Metropolitan

The final week of the season at the Metropolitan Opera House began last evening with a performance of 'Aida" which might be a theme for considerable comment were it not that no one thing signifies greatly now. There was a delightful diversity of styles ranging from the elegance of Edward Johnson as Radames to the bumptiousness of the aggressive Mr. Bohnen as Amonasro.
There was Maria Müller as the heroine and Mme. Claussen as the wicked and triumphant princess. The later showed not only experience and knowledge of routines of the opera, but her voice disclosed an improved vocalism, She sang well.

Mr. Johnson gave a highly creditable impersonation of the young Egyptian warrior, but music of the extremely vigorous type, such as that of "Aida," is not best suited to his voice. He is always an artist and commands admiration, but there are roles in which it is possible for him more directly to reach the understanding and arouse the enthusiasm of an entire audience. Miss Müller's voice is also unsuited to this score and it may be that the strenuous efforts she has to make to sing over the heavy ensembles will do her no good. Furthermore, such an air as "Ritorna Vincitor" lies yet outside the nature of her art.

Mr. Bohnen has been exhibited before as the Ethiopian king. There is no question that this monarch is a fighter and that he is accustomed to appearing at any public meeting at which he is present. However, the barytone sang sometimes, and he does not always take the trouble to do that. Since individual impersonations are under review, it may be well to note that Mr. McPherson sang the music of the king very well, but had only vague ideas about the deportment of operatic Pharaohs. Mr. Pinza attended incidentally to the continual objections of the ecclesiastic party.



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