[Met Performance] CID:97210
Der Rosenkavalier {42} Metropolitan Opera House: 11/17/1927.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 17, 1927


DER ROSENKAVALIER {42}
R. Strauss-Hofmannsthal

Octavian.....................Grete Stückgold
Princess von Werdenberg......Florence Easton
Baron Ochs...................Richard Mayr
Sophie.......................Editha Fleischer
Faninal......................Gustav Schützendorf
Annina.......................Kathleen Howard
Valzacchi....................Angelo Badà
Italian Singer...............Alfio Tedesco
Marianne.....................Dorothee Manski
Mahomet......................Madeline Leweck
Princess' Major-domo.........Max Altglass
Orphan.......................Mildred Parisette
Orphan.......................Dorothea Flexer
Orphan.......................Philine Falco
Milliner.....................Phradie Wells
Animal Vendor................Raffaele Lipparini
Hairdresser..................Armando Agnini
Notary.......................William Gustafson
Leopold......................Ludwig Burgstaller
Faninal's Major-domo.........Raimondo Ditello
Innkeeper....................George Meader
Police Commissioner..........James Wolfe

Conductor....................Artur Bodanzky

Director................Wilhelm von Wymetal
Set designer.................Hans Kautsky
Costume designer.............Alfred Roller

Der Rosenkavalier received five performances this season.

Review signed I. B. F. in the New York Telegram

'ROSENKAVALIER' HEARD AT THE MET

Strauss's First Comic Opera Enjoyed by Large Audience

Those who braved last night's storm to hear "Der Rosenkavalier" at the Metropolitan Opera House were rewarded with a delightful and most enjoyable evening. The rain outside could not dampen the happy spirits within the opera house and the hilarity on the stage was shared by the audience.

"Rosenkvalier" is the first comic opera written by Richard Strauss. It is a comedy of the Beaumarchais period and while it contains much humor, lightness and frivolity, at times, particularly in the third act, it leans strongly toward the burlesque. The poet, Mr. von Hofmannsthal, who wrote the libretto, did not do justice to himself in this work. It is too commonplace, although it is amusing, for a man of his talent and ability.

The same can be said for Mr. Strauss. He, too, was too easily satisfied with the first jottings of his pen. Fortunately, anything written by Mr. Strauss would be good, for he is among the greatest masters of technique in musical composition alive today. But knowing how much better has come from that prolific composer, his shortcomings become all the more obvious. But this is all forgotten when one is under the spell of his delightful melodies. It is with difficulty that one's seat is retained when the orchestra plays the charming waltz tunes with which the score is replete. Their compelling, swaying rhythm recall the composer's namesake, the Johann Strausses, father and son, the latter being known as the "Waltz King."

The cast in general gave a splendid interpretation of this amusing comedy. Miss Stuckgold, who is a newcomer this season to the ranks of the Metropolitan, not only made a most comely Octavian, but played the role with understanding. Her boyish figure and youthful looks lent itself well to the part. Another whose appearance added to the enjoyment of the opera was Miss Fleischer, whose voice, although small, has a sweet and appealing quality. Miss Easton, always reliable, was most sympathetic in her role. Mr. Mayr, also a newcomer this year, made a splendid and comical Baron. He sang well and acted better and brought forth many an audible laugh from the audience. Of course, Gustav Schützendorf was again the splendid actor he is even in the small role of von Faninal.

In fact, the entire cast and orchestra under the forceful hand of Mr. Bodanzky cooperated completely and gave a performance that was delightful, amusing and charming.



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