[Met Performance] CID:97470
Tosca {203} Brooklyn Academy of Music,New York, Brooklyn: 12/6/1927.

(Review)


New York, Brooklyn
December 6, 1927


TOSCA {203}

Tosca...................Maria Jeritza
Cavaradossi.............Frederick Jagel
Scarpia.................Antonio Scotti
Sacristan...............Pompilio Malatesta
Spoletta................Giordano Paltrinieri
Angelotti...............Paolo Ananian
Sciarrone...............Vincenzo Reschiglian
Shepherd................Dorothea Flexer
Jailer..................Millo Picco

Conductor...............Vincenzo Bellezza

Review of Felix Deyo in the Brooklyn Standard Union

Jeritza in 'Tosca' At Brooklyn Academy

Again for the delectation of Brooklyn subscribers and box-office patrons, the Metropolitan Opera Company last night put on its Jeritza-Scotti version of Puccini's "Tosca," a trump card offering that may be depended upon to draw a capacity audience. Hence, the Academy of Music was brilliantly astir. It was a keenly enthusiastic audience, too, for Jeritza was quite at her dramatic best. Vocally also, she shone, her tones opulent and sure, her phrase coloring exquisite, her recitatives flexible in accent and expression. Personally, as usual, she was resplendent, featuring new eye-dazzling garments. "Vissi d'arte" was sung in her sensational manner. Lying face downward on the floor and slowly arising during the refrain. It is always a pleasure to follow Jertiza's stage movements. She never stumbles, she never becomes entangled in her lengthsome train, her gestures are commanding. Last night, indeed, Jeritza seemed a veritable empress of tragedy. Her work was most carefully contrived, her effects calculated to the dot, yet in total the results bore the stamp of seeming spontaneity.

Mr. Scotti's Scarpia is always at its evil best against the Tosca of Jeritza. For operateers this Scarpia (the only Scarpia seen at the Metropolitan during the past quarter century) is a tradition. It has that fullness of character that makes a complete delineation.

Additional interest attached itself to the evening's performance by the appearance of Frederick Jagel, the twenty-six year old Brooklyn tenor. Mr. Jagel received a cordial greeting. Obviously nervous at the beginning he quickly rallied under the influence of Mme. Jertiza's kindly directed stimulus. Quite boyish in face, and short and slender in figure, Mr. Jagel's Cavaradossi was not quite the ideal romantic lover; throughout the embracing scenes and calculatory endearments, in Jertiza's arms, he seemed to be quite son-like. But Mr. Jagel sang artistically. His voice is one that produces a beautiful and convincing effect. He commands a refined style and sings sincerely rather than sensationally. As an operatic actor he knows the points, but needs a little more experience to perfect them.

Others of the cast were Messrs. Malatesta, Ananian, Paltrinieri, Reschiglian, Picco, and Miss Dorothea Flexer. Mr. Bellezza conducted.

Jeritza comes to Brooklyn again on January 3, in Puccini's "Turandot."



Added Index Entries for Subjects and Names


Back to short citation(s).