[Met Performance] CID:97980
La Traviata {148} Matinee ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 01/13/1928.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 13, 1928 Matinee


LA TRAVIATA {148}
Giuseppe Verdi--Francesco Maria Piave

Violetta................Amelita Galli-Curci
Alfredo.................Giacomo Lauri-Volpi
Germont.................Giuseppe De Luca
Flora...................Minnie Egener
Gastone.................Giordano Paltrinieri
Baron Douphol...........Vincenzo Reschiglian
Marquis D'Obigny........Millo Picco
Dr. Grenvil.............Paolo Ananian
Annina..................Philine Falco

Conductor...............Tullio Serafin

Director................Samuel Thewman
Set designer............Joseph Urban
Costume designer........Mathilde Castel-Bert
Choreographer...........Rosina Galli

La Traviata received four performances this season.

Review of Charles D. Isaacson in the New York Telegraph

GALLI-CURCI IN 'TRAVIATA'

Sings Supremely as Invalid Violetta at Well-Attended Matinee

The greatest voice in the world was heard again yesterday afternoon, in a special matinee at the Metropolitan Opera House. Galli-Curci surpassed even herself in her singing of the invalid Violetta. Rarely has she reached the heights of purest vocalization which she scaled with ease in the first "Traviata" of the season. Not only did she pour forth the magical river of sainted sound, but she demonstrated the unrivalled agility of her technical equipment. She seemed to be intent on accomplishing the most hazardous, bewildering and thrilling runs, roulades and skyrocketing, and in achieving the results in a manner, free of effort or strain.

To hear her, in the long, strenuous scenes which require almost uninterrupted singing, allowing scarcely the pauses, then to compare the quiet, restrained unforced style of Galli-Curci with the screaming, pushing, striving, working, energizing, agonizing, methods of so many artists who are really worthwhile, is to appreciate this famous vocal equipment and its directness.

Yet there was still another element worthy of special commendation yesterday afternoon in the work of Galli-Curci. She has never been praised for her worth as an actress. It would be too much to expect also that she could be a powerful exponent of the dramatic art. For instance, Chaliapin is the actor and not the singer. Nevertheless, in the last scene of "Traviata," the coloratura also lived the character. This Violetta was dying. This Violetta was not prostrate in silence and vigorous in singing. The artist never forgot the character for her vocal phrases. Would that there was more of this!

Noteworthy in the cast was De Luca as the elder Germont. He was always the father, the gentleman, the insistent pleader and, later, the penitent. De Luca is the exception to the rule - actor and singer - almost the finest representative at the Metropolitan.

Lauri-Volpi was a worthy third in the presence of Galli-Curci and De Luca. His singing was flawless, and his ardor sincere. Sometimes he forgot his sweetheart in his eagerness not to overlook the audience. He was too happy when he came to the ball. In the last entrance, after his long absence, he exhibited about as much eagerness as a slow motion picture actor, enacting old age.

Lovely work was done by the ballet. Miss Falco turned her little role into a worthy one; Miss Egener was Flora. Messrs. Paltrinieri, Reschiglian, Picco and Ananian completed a splendid cast. The conductor was Tullio Serafin. He perhaps figured out very soon what was wrong with the woodwind section, especially in the second act. The performance was given for the benefit of the Willoughby House and School Settlement. The house was almost capacity, so we are sure the fund was swelled.



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