[Met Performance] CID:98640
Le Prophète {72} Metropolitan Opera House: 02/29/1928.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
February 29, 1928


LE PROPHÈTE {72}

Jean of Leyden..........Giovanni Martinelli
Berthe..................Leonora Corona
Fidès...................Karin Branzell
Zacharie................Ezio Pinza
Jonas...................Alfio Tedesco
Mathisen................Gustav Schützendorf
Count Oberthal..........Léon Rothier
Peasant.................Giordano Paltrinieri
Anabaptist..............Paolo Ananian
Officer.................Max Altglass
Citizen.................Vincenzo Reschiglian
Captain.................George Cehanovsky
Choirboy................Minnie Egener
Choirboy................Philine Falco
Choirboy................Mildred Parisette
Choirboy................Mary Bonetti
Choirboy................Dorothea Flexer
Choirboy................Charlotte Ryan
Dance...................Rosina Galli
Dance...................Giuseppe Bonfiglio

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

Review (unsigned) in the New York Telegraph

'LE PROPHETE'

There is no doubt that when Giacomo Meyerbeer wrote "Le Prophete" he knew the opera stage had its possibilities and limitations. One hears the score and sees it in the lavish staging of the Metropolitan environment to realize ever again the superb showmanship of the Italianized German whom Wagner termed the weathercock of music.

In all the panorama of grand opera one wonders again if there is anything to surpass the Coronation Scene for grandeur and coloring while combining a piece of dramatic byplay in the mother-son situation, which is second to nothing in a the theatre for thrills.

Of course, she understands and shakes her head, "No." Last night Martinelli as John of Leyden, fighting against a cold, sang with dignity and power, and Karin Branzell, the Mother, was a fine figure opposite him, musically and dramatically.

For that beautiful lady, Leonora Corona, may it be said that the Metropolitan stage seems now to be a happy hunting ground for her; she is at home; her lovely presence graces each scene in which she participates, and her vocal powers are finding themselves in the huge auditorium. She is singly, pleasantly and satisfying.

Artur Bodanzky conducted with fervor and mastery. He brought the first scene to a close with a bang! The Anabaptist Chorus was immense.



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