[Met Performance] CID:98830
Tosca {207} Matinee ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 03/13/1928.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
March 13, 1928 Matinee


TOSCA {207}

Tosca...................Leonora Corona
Cavaradossi.............Beniamino Gigli
Scarpia.................Antonio Scotti
Sacristan...............Pompilio Malatesta
Spoletta................Giordano Paltrinieri
Angelotti...............Paolo Ananian
Sciarrone...............Vincenzo Reschiglian
Shepherd................Dorothea Flexer
Jailer..................Millo Picco

Conductor...............Vincenzo Bellezza

Review of Francis D. Perkins in the New York Tribune

Leonora Corona Sings in 'Tosca' Benefit Matinee

Young Soprano From Texas Shows Improved Voice in Third Metropolitan Role

Gigli Also in Performance for Nassau Children's Society

Leonora Corona, the Metropolitan Opera Company's young soprano added a third role yesterday afternoon to the list of parts she has sung at the Metropolitan Opera House, when she appeared in a performance of "Tosca" given for the benefit of the Nassau County branch of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. Beniamino Gigli sang Mario Cavarodossi for the first time here since 1925, while Antonio Scotti was the inevitable Baron Scarpia.

Miss. Corona, who already has sung Tosca in Italy and Latin America, appeared at home in the part of the harassed heroine, and, in the acts we witnessed - the second and third - gave an effective performance, no sparing of emotion. The role can get along successfully without great singing, though it profits by it; Miss Corona's singing yesterday had points showing improvement over previous performances, but repeated, on the whole, the impression of a strong voice which may prove of a high caliber, but which, at present, is used in a manner leaving much room for improvement. Clarity and firmness of tone were present at times, but departures from them still much too frequent. The net impression might be called one of a good, but unfinished voice.

"Vissi d'arte," well begun, with a reserve carried slightly excess in some later passages of the aria, was sung on the sofa, instead of prone on the floor in the Jeritza manner - which, indeed, is not an essential feature of the song. Miss Corona discovered that Mario was really dead sooner than Mme. Jeritza; her performance here was perfectly plausible, but less effective than the gradual apprehension and eventual realization of the Viennese soprano. In general, Miss Corona proved hardly a great Tosca, but a serviceable one.

Mr. Gigli was in good voice, and Mr. Scotti offered his familiar Scarpia. Miss Flexer and Messrs. Ananian, Malatesta, Paltrinieri, Reschiglian and Picco completed the cast and Mr. Bellezza conducted. Prolonged applause and many recalls followed.



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